time lapse

Showing 68 posts tagged time lapse

If you’ve seen how underwater time-lapse can show the secret life of a coral reef on this site, then you already know that brilliantly fluorescing corals and sponges have fascinating, unseen experiences. But you’ve never seen “slow” marine animals like this: Slow Life by University of Queensland PhD student Daniel Stoupin.

To make this little clip I took 150000 shots. Why so many? Because macro photography involves shallow depth of field. To extend it, I used focus stacking. Each frame of the video is actually a stack that consists of 3-12 shots where in-focus areas are merged. Just the intro and last scene are regular real-time footage. One frame required about 10 minutes of processing time (raw conversion + stacking). Unfortunately, the success rate was very low due to copious technical challenges and I spent almost 9 long months just to learn how to make these kinds of videos and understand how to work with these delicate creatures.

Make sure that you watch this full-screen, HD actual size. The detail is incredible.

In the archives: more coral and time lapse.

via Kottke. Thanks, @cmykadam.

Watch Denver-based Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker build Rise and Skate, a six foot by six foot paper cut light box for skateboard art fundraiser Bordo Bello at the AIGA National Center, New York. On their work, from Black Book

They started experimenting with paper cut shadow boxes in 2010 with hand painted watercolor paper which was then cut and assembled in a wooden box to create a diorama, with years of practice their art became more intricate and minimal at the same time. They started experimenting with lights and simplified their pieces by losing the colored aspect of the paper. They have since then evolved to add their own style of paper cut art incorporating back-lit light boxes using flexible LED strip lights.

More of their work:

In the archives: more stunning paper projects, including ones by Irving Harper, Ödland, and Rob Ryan.

via Colossal.

Over an hour and a half of construction captured by a picture taken every four seconds, a spider weaves its web. This one is a larger size, but there’s some extra climbing involved when you’re a smaller spider.

Related reading: all about spider webs, including the different structures. Related watching: more spiders, including this video of a Tube Web Spider, a Stag Beetle, and a Long-horned Beetle at the Natural History Museum in London.

For the last five years, Dr. Pim Bongaerts of University of Queensland’s Global Change Institute has been documenting the lives of corals through time-lapse photography. It all happens too slowly for the human eye, but capturing life in a coral reef over longer periods of time reveals much more about their growth, locomotion, and even their violent competition with each other. The video above is from BBC News: Underwater time-lapse shows secret life of a coral reef.

Plus some extra info from NOAA.gov:

So what exactly are corals?

Corals actually comprise an ancient and unique partnership, called symbiosis, that benefits both animal and plant life in the ocean. Corals are animals, though, because they do not make their own food, as plants do. Corals have tiny, tentacle-like arms that they use to capture their food from the water and sweep into their inscrutable mouths.

Any structure that we call a “coral” is, in fact, made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny coral creatures called polyps…

In the archives: more coral.

Thanks, Annie.

Updated video link.

The timelapsed formation of snowflakes in macrofocus by Vyacheslav Ivanov. Music: Aphex Twin - Avril 14th.

Update via Colossal: “Ivanov confirms from his home in St. Petersburg that the video is indeed genuine (non digital) and was filmed through a microscope with a ‘lot of effort and patience.’”

Read more about the science behind the snowflake’s formation at io9.

Related watching: Snow Facts Cheat Sheetice crystals form on a soap bubblejazz and tiny hailstones, and instant ice crystals.

via Kuriositas.