video

Showing 456 posts tagged video

DIY experiments and videos are two of our favorite things, so we were thrilled to hear about GE’s Six Second Science Fair. The week-long celebration resulted in over 600 submitted projects, and GE’s compilation video, via jtotheizzoe, includes a wide variety of shared experiments from kids and adults alike.

It’s fun to watch, but it’s also an excellent resource for checking out science experiments (like these) that you can do yourself. We’re definitely inspired to try a few…

How much science can you fit into 6 seconds?

Update: from Joe at It’s Okay to Be Smart, here’s a list of all of the experiments explained, including some links to instructions.

We love this 2011 video series, Museum of Obsolete Objects by Germany-based agency Jung von Matt, showcasing once-brand-new technologies that became "lost technical marvels" as they were surpassed by newer inventions. Their videos feature the typewriter, the cassette tape, a mechanical hand-mixer and many other once well-known objects. Above: The Quill.

Watch more videos on inventions and how things work.

Video camera technology has improved immensely in recent years, allowing scientists like lightning physicist Vladislav Mazur and meteorologist Tom Warner to analyze high speed footage of these captivating bolts of electricity in the sky.

In this video, Incredible Slow Motion Lightning Strike, via sagansense, we see just 1 second of lightning slowed down into 3 minutes. Yes, 1 sec = 3 mins.

One more to watch: a downward lightning negative ground flash captured at 7,207 images per second

This hidden camera adventure through the postal system, From A to B, began when Ruben van der Vleuten wanted to know, What happens when you send something by mail?

So instead of sitting back I started a simple project to actually see it myself. I put a small camera in a box, build a timer circuit using Arduino and shipped it.

That’s as simple as it is. The timer circuit was set to make a 3 sec video every minute and make longer videos while the box was movin: to not miss on the ‘interesting’ parts.

…like conveyor belts! We love videos like this, not only because we get to see from a perspective that we’ve never seen before, but because it would make a great DIY project.

Check out van der Vleuten’s site to see more about the box, its innerworkings, and a highlights video with some real time clips.

Thanks, @kvetchup.

Google Creative Director Alexander Chen composes a song by filming some solo viola melodies on Google Glass and then weaving the video clips together in overlapping loops.

What results is not only a catchy musical piece, but a peek into the first-person visual perspective of the instrument player as things continue to happen in the room. It’s as if the music is being scored for that moment, as the dog and baby play in the background.

Watch more videos featuring instruments and music.

via explore-blog.