water

Showing 223 posts tagged water

This amphibious fish is called a mudskipper and it uses its pectoral fins to walk on land, specifically mud. It also rolls, jumps, digs, excavates, socializes, fights for territory, and breathes air while not being in the water. Watch this amazing clip from the David Attenborough-narrated BBC Life seriesepisode 04: Fish.

Related watching from the same episode, two weedy seadragons dance into the night, and from Sci-news, a walking bamboo shark.

In this episode of Songs for Unusual Creatures, Michael Hearst visits the Los Angeles Zoo's Chinese Giant Salamander. This is the world’s largest salamander and the world’s largest extant amphibian, growing up to six feet long. It has a history that goes back 170 million years — that’s long before Tyrannosaurus Rex, who roamed the planet 67 to 65 million years ago, and way before the theremin and stylophone were invented.

Watch more Songs for Unusual Creatures and more videos with instruments in the archives.

And if you want your own, you’ll find the unusual Stylophone Retro Pocket Synth here.

For the last five years, Dr. Pim Bongaerts of University of Queensland’s Global Change Institute has been documenting the lives of corals through time-lapse photography. It all happens too slowly for the human eye, but capturing life in a coral reef over longer periods of time reveals much more about their growth, locomotion, and even their violent competition with each other. The video above is from BBC News: Underwater time-lapse shows secret life of a coral reef.

Plus some extra info from NOAA.gov:

So what exactly are corals?

Corals actually comprise an ancient and unique partnership, called symbiosis, that benefits both animal and plant life in the ocean. Corals are animals, though, because they do not make their own food, as plants do. Corals have tiny, tentacle-like arms that they use to capture their food from the water and sweep into their inscrutable mouths.

Any structure that we call a “coral” is, in fact, made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny coral creatures called polyps…

In the archives: more coral.

Thanks, Annie.

Updated video link.

Gravitational acceleration + optical illusions + how to! In this Get Set… Demonstrate, science teacher Alom Shaha shows step by step how to create Pearls of Water, a physics-defying demonstration that must look even more unbelievable in person than it does on video.

And if you want to see this in person, the instructions, equipment list, and safety notes for setting it up are here (pdf).

Want to see similar versions of this illusion? Check out artist Matt Kenyon’s Supermajor and Brusspup’s Amazing Water and Sound Experiment.

via Science Demo.