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Showing 224 posts tagged water

From The New York Times, Olympics 2014: The Science of Snowmaking

Machines make snow the same way nature does, by freezing water droplets. But they do it a few feet above the ground, rather than in the much colder conditions high in the atmosphere. Snowmaking machines employ a few thermodynamic tricks to help, but at times there is a limit to what physics can do…

…a droplet may not freeze entirely during the few seconds it takes to fall to the ground — what snowmakers call hang time.

“We’re basically making eggs,” Mr. Moulton said — icy shells around still-liquid centers.

Related snow videos: when nature handles it, How Is Snow Made?

This papercraft pop-up book illustrates how South America and Africa used to be connected, how the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart 200 million years ago, how the Earth's seven primary tectonic plates are ever-shifting, and much more in this TED-Ed by educator Michael Molina: The Pangaea Pop-up.

There’s more paper-inspired science storytelling in the archives, including The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace, stop-motion shorts by Studio Nos, Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale), and another pop-up book: Revolution ( Life Cycle of a Drop of Water).

Despite what it looks like, this is not a short clip from a Hayao Miyazaki film. These are banggai cardinalfish eggs with still-forming fish inside. Their eyes are quite clear. Can you see their heartbeats?

These three small creatures were filmed pre-hatched by Richard Ross, CalAcademy’s Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium. Normally, male banggai cardinafish, Pterapogon kauderni, keep around 90 fertilized eggs in their mouths for 30 days while the eggs mature — they don’t eat at all during that month — but on occasion, some eggs are spit out early. Here’s another video that shows larger babies in a male’s mouth:

The caption by mikew9788: “They are so big now you can see that they have the same coloration as the adults. I expect the male to spit the babies out any day now.” 

While they are bred successfully in captivity, Banggai are endangered in the wilds of the Banggai Islands in Sulawesi, Indonesia. You can learn more at Banggai-Rescue.com.  

Watch more fish and more babies.

via Earth Touch.