water

Showing 227 posts tagged water

How can the physics and engineering of wind and water change a country? From the world of European travel guides, here’s a quick primer: The Netherlands: Working Windmills.

300 years ago, half of what we know as The Netherlands was under water. Slowly, the former seabed was reclaimed and the Dutch went to work drying the ground with the country’s leading natural resource - the wind. Over 1000 windmills, some still functioning, survive in the Netherlands today, reminding locals and tourists alike of the clever engine that powered the creation of this land. 

Related reading: Archimedes’ screw. Related watching: how wind turbines workwingtip vortices, Windswept, The Old Mill, and more amazing videos about The Netherlands.

From The New York Times, Olympics 2014: The Science of Snowmaking

Machines make snow the same way nature does, by freezing water droplets. But they do it a few feet above the ground, rather than in the much colder conditions high in the atmosphere. Snowmaking machines employ a few thermodynamic tricks to help, but at times there is a limit to what physics can do…

…a droplet may not freeze entirely during the few seconds it takes to fall to the ground — what snowmakers call hang time.

“We’re basically making eggs,” Mr. Moulton said — icy shells around still-liquid centers.

Related snow videos: when nature handles it, How Is Snow Made?