waves

Showing 6 posts tagged waves

Artist Soo Sunny Park's Unwoven Light, filmed by Walley Films.

Seeing a Styrofoam cup stuck on a fence one day got Park thinking about the chain link’s properties of being both rigid and porous, of acting as a boundary while retaining an appearance of openness… 

Explains Park, “Like a net, the sculpture is a filter that is meant to capture the light that is already there and force it to reveal itself. Now we can see it, the light, in purple shadows and yellow-green reflections that both mirror the shape of the fence and restructure the space they inhabit.”

Related watching from Rice University, a physicist’s perspective on Park’s shimmering, iridescent piece, featuring Jason Hafner, Associate Professor of Physics, Astronomy and Chemistry at Rice, and a time-lapse of the installation:

Related watching: iridescence and more art installations.

via It’s Nice That.

The New York Times’ video profile of Max Mulhern’s “Aqua Dice” shows how the artist’s love for the sea and his interest in unknown outcomes came together into one project.

Fate adrift, these two giant sea dice were constructed out of plywood, pine, PVC and epoxy. Technically illegal — “you’re not allowed to put an object on the water that’s unattended, and you’re not allowed to go to sea if there’s not a constant watch on-board,” explains Mulhern, — they are designed to collapse on impact so as not to be a danger to any other vessels, and are brightly painted. They also have GPS in both of them, customized by technology students, to track where ocean currents are taking the dice and how far apart they are from each other.

“I’ve spoken to a lot of ocean scientists and they’re thinking that the dice will separate quickly,” he said. “What I like about that is the dual possibilities: there’s one throw and two outcomes, two possible destinations — and destinies.”

Whether you love art, love sailing or love the unknown, you can track the dice (and even bet as to where they’ll eventually land) on Mulhern’s site, on this map, or follow the journey on Facebook.

via Visual News.

If you happen to find yourself driving in Norway, be sure to drive along the Atlanterhavsveien or The Atlantic Ocean Road, located here. This 5.2 mile road was built in the 1980s to connect a series of islands and skerries (small rocky islands too small for anyone to live on). It has eight bridges, four resting places, and views that enjoy all kinds of weather conditions and (from the look of this viral video) lots of interaction with the ocean!