wind

Showing 29 posts tagged wind

How can the physics and engineering of wind and water change a country? From the world of European travel guides, here’s a quick primer: The Netherlands: Working Windmills.

300 years ago, half of what we know as The Netherlands was under water. Slowly, the former seabed was reclaimed and the Dutch went to work drying the ground with the country’s leading natural resource - the wind. Over 1000 windmills, some still functioning, survive in the Netherlands today, reminding locals and tourists alike of the clever engine that powered the creation of this land. 

Related reading: Archimedes’ screw. Related watching: how wind turbines workwingtip vortices, Windswept, The Old Mill, and more amazing videos about The Netherlands.

This is something that we’d like to see and hear in person: The Singing, Ringing Tree was designed by architects Mike Tonkin and Anna Liu in 2006. It sits on a hill in Lancashire, England, and as the winds blow, the discordant steel pipes “play” the wind. From Wikipedia

Some of the pipes are primarily structural and aesthetic elements, while others have been cut across their width enabling the sound. The harmonic and singing qualities of the tree were produced by tuning the pipes according to their length by adding holes to the underside of each.

There’s more wind and more sound in the archives, including the similar Aeolus, an Acoustic Wind Pavilion, some a whale song-filled diving encounter, and the Sesame Street classic How a Saxophone is Made

Thanks, @benjohnbarnes.

Solar Bell, a kite-like wind sculpture made of lighter-than-air materials — carbon fiber tubing and paper-thin solar panels — by Argentinian artist Tomàs Saraceno, in association with the Aerospace Engineering Faculty at TU Delft, The Netherlands.

The design of Solar Bell is based on a model of a modular tetrahedron, or four-sided pyramid, invented by Alexander Graham Bell during his early investigations into manned flight. Bell made important discoveries in the field of aviation and frame construction, and happened upon the strongest geometrical structure in the known cosmos—the octet truss—the same space frame that Buckminster Fuller later followed in his Geodesic dome. Saraceno breathes new life into Bell’s legacy by using the materials and knowledge of our time.

via DesignBoom.