Get smart curated videos delivered to your inbox every week.      
The Kid Should See This

How to make your own thaumatrope

Cut out a white cardboard circle. On the front, draw something on the left. On the back, draw something upside down on the right. Punch two holes in the sides of the circle, as shown above, and thread string through either side. When you twist them, they begin to spin, joining the front and back images together. These examples might provide some inspiration.

Plus, more of what happens when you layer the drawings:

The thaumatrope is among the simplest of the “persistence of vision” toys that were introduced in the early 19th century. In its basic form it is a card with a different picture on each surface and string attached to each side. When the string is wound up then released the card spins rapidly merging the two pictures together.

Check out the history of thaumatropes, and make more of your own!

Updated video.

This award-winning video collection is reader-supported. Become a sustaining member to keep TKSST online and free for everyone, including teachers and parents who use it as a resource to spark learning and curiosity for kids.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

Crafting Cell Diagrams

Rion Nakaya

Andrew Fox’s Calligraphy Animals Animated

Rion Nakaya

The Challenge of a Straight Line and ‘Making Art Concrete’ – Getty Museum

Rion Nakaya

How to draw a Penrose Rectangle & other impossible objects

Rion Nakaya

How to fold a Christmas Tree Napkin

Rion Nakaya

Juan Fontanive‘s mechanical, looping flipbooks: Vivarium

Rion Nakaya

How to make a spinning top

Rion Nakaya

Juan Fontanive’s mechanical flip books of hummingbirds

Rion Nakaya

The Magic Moment: Work by paper engineer Peter Dahmen

Rion Nakaya