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3D Printing Dinosaurs: The mad science of new paleontology

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File under laser scanners, 3D printers and dinosaur bones… not so surprisingly a great combination, as introduced by Dr. Kenneth Lacovara of Drexel University:

“For years and years, vertebrate paleontologists have really been confined to working with the shapes, with the morphology, of bones and with skeletons, as you can see behind me here. And our hypotheses about how these ancient animals lived and moved was based on how we could put these bones together in the physical world.

“And now for the first time in the history of paleontology, we’re able to move beyond those methods and into this virtual landscape where we can test our biomechanical hypotheses in rigorous ways that were never possible before.”

In February 2012, Dr. Lacovara’s paleontology department teamed up with the University’s engineering department to scan their fossils to make 3D models that could be made into fully working arms and legs.

scanning
Wrap some engineered muscles around those… add more parts… and perhaps we’ve got the most accurate robot dinosaur ever made!

To read more, check out Printing dinosaurs: the mad science of new paleontology, from The Verge, July 2012.

Watch these videos next:
• Paleontology 101 with Dr. Lindsay Zanno
• A cliff wall full of dinosaur footprints in Spain
• Reverse engineering the locomotion of a prehistoric reptile ancestor
• Rebuilding a real T. Rex with scientific research and new technologies
• A titanosaur in 360° VR with Sir David Attenborough

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