Get smart curated videos delivered to your inbox every week.      
The Kid Should See This

3D printing ‘hyperelastic bone’ to mend injuries

Hyperelastic bone may be a 3D-printed solution for helping to mend our bones in the future. Cost-effective and customizable, the material is both a “structural element and a scaffold for bone regeneration,” as shown in the Science Magazine video above. On Northwestern University’s work they explain:

Their hyperelastic bone is a type of scaffold made up of hydroxyapatite, a naturally occurring mineral that exists in our bones and teeth, and a biocompatible polymer called polycaprolactone, and a solvent. Hydroxyapatite provides strength and offers chemical cues to stem cells to create bone. The polycaprolactone polymer adds flexibility, and the solvent sticks the 3D-printed layers together as it evaporates during printing. The mixture is blended into an ink that is dispensed by the printer, layer by layer, into exact shapes matching the bone that needs to be replaced. The idea is, a patient would come in with a nasty broken bone—say, a shattered jaw—and instead of going through painful autograft surgeries or waiting for a custom scaffold to be manufactured, he or she could be x-rayed and a 3D-printed hyperelastic bone scaffold could be printed that same day.

Next, watch more 3D printing videos, including Derby the dog runs on his 3D printed prosthetic paws and Boy gets prosthetic hand made by 3-D printer.

🌈 Related videos

Mexico Dinosaur Dig Reveals Massive 70 Million Year Old Bones

Rion Nakaya

The world’s largest collection of whale bones

Rion Nakaya

Skull of the Olinguito – AMNH: Shelf Life

Rion Nakaya

What’s the difference between horns and antlers?

Rion Nakaya

3D Printing Dinosaurs: The mad science of new paleontology

Rion Nakaya

Creating The Never-Ending Bloom: John Edmark’s spiral geometries

Rion Nakaya

Anatomy of Preservation: Fruit bat, from a Specimen to an Object of Study

Rion Nakaya

Dissecting owl pellets and cleaning the bones

Rion Nakaya

Hydrophytes, 4D-printed aquatic ‘plants’ for the future

Rion Nakaya

Get 7 smart videos delivered every week.

 

Subscribe