The Kid Should See This

3D Printing Dinosaurs: The mad science of new paleontology

File under laser scanners, 3D printers and dinosaur bones… not so surprisingly a great combination, as introduced by Dr. Kenneth Lacovara of Drexel University:

“For years and years, vertebrate paleontologists have really been confined to working with the shapes, with the morphology, of bones and with skeletons, as you can see behind me here. And our hypotheses about how these ancient animals lived and moved was based on how we could put these bones together in the physical world.

“And now for the first time in the history of paleontology, we’re able to move beyond those methods and into this virtual landscape where we can test our biomechanical hypotheses in rigorous ways that were never possible before.”

In February 2012, Dr. Lacovara’s paleontology department teamed up with the University’s engineering department to scan their fossils to make 3D models that could be made into fully working arms and legs. Wrap some engineered muscles around those… add more parts… and perhaps we’ve got the most accurate robot dinosaur ever made!

To read more, check out Printing dinosaurs: the mad science of new paleontology, from The Verge, July 2012.

This feature is being tested. Saves will disappear if you clear cookies. Find saved videos here.

🌈 Related videos

Knock Knock – A touch & sound calculator

Rion Nakaya

Triceratops vs Torosaurus

Rion Nakaya

Photography, from camera obscura to camera phone

Rion Nakaya

Google Science Fair 2012

Rion Nakaya

Filming bats with slow motion & thermal cameras

Rion Nakaya

Seahorse’s Armor Gives Engineers Insight Into Robotics Designs

Rion Nakaya

Anatomy of Preservation: Fruit bat, from a Specimen to an Object of Study

Rion Nakaya

Building a House the Eco-Friendly Way with 3D Printing

Rion Nakaya

Reverse engineering the locomotion of a prehistoric reptile ancestor

Rion Nakaya

 
Browse the TKSST Video Collections

Get 7 smart videos delivered every week.

 

Subscribe