The Kid Should See This

Dancing baby stingrays

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Is it their little pink faces or their little wiggling “feet” that make baby stingrays so phenomenal to watch? (Spoiler: alas, those are pelvic fins, not tiny, dancing feet.) These little guys were filmed in 2010 at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Oregon. 

Stingrays are ovoviparous, meaning that the eggs develop and hatch inside the mother, who then give birth to live young. They have between 5 and 13 offspring at a time. Before birth, the female holds the embryos in the womb without a placenta. Instead, the embryos absorb nutrients from a yolk sac, and after the sac is depleted, the mother provides uterine “milk”.

Update: A few readers have suggested these might be skates. Anyone know for sure? Tweet @thekidshouldsee.

via IFLScience

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