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The Kid Should See This

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field in 3D

In 1996, and again in 2004, astronomers pointed the Hubble Telescope at what seemed to be completely empty patches of sky — no planets, stars, or galaxies that we could see. What would we find when we looked farther into the universe than we ever had before? 

From Deep Astronomy, The Hubble Ultra Deep Field in 3D, via colchrishadfield:

The least-known parts of our universe, made compellingly visible through human ingenuity; 4 minutes well-spent.

Related viewing: Measuring the Universe and The Most Astounding Fact – Neil deGrasse Tyson.

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This video was posted 7 years ago.

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