The Kid Should See This

Imping an injured owl’s wing to make it stronger

If you’re a two year old, injured snowy owl in need of some new feathers, you’ll be lucky to find yourself at a raptor center like the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota. There, someone like Avian physiologist Lori Arent can perform the modern version of an old falconers’ procedure called imping – when a bird’s damaged flight feathers are replaced with a stronger ones. From National Geographic:

“I have a whole freezer full of harvested feathers, of different types and sizes, and I wanted to choose the right ones for this animal. I picked feathers from a male the same age as this bird and they fit perfectly…” 

She then whittled small sticks of bamboo so that one end poked into the shaft of the new feather and the other into the shaft still attached to the bird (where the burned feathers had been carefully sheared off).

With a little drop of quick-drying epoxy, she cemented each new feather into place. “If attached right, the new feathers are just as effective as the old ones” in letting a bird do all of its aerial maneuvers, she said….

Eventually, the owl will lose the borrowed feathers—in a process called molting—and grow its own new ones.

Snowy owls are amazing animals that travel long distances every year. Watch Snowy Owl Invasion.

And another lucky bird: Rocky the Bald Eagle is released from the Eagle Valley Raptor Center.

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