The Kid Should See This

The Known Universe, an AMNH visualization

Watch more with these video collections:

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History.”

This film was a part of the 2009/2010 exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe. And it’s awesome.Β From AMNH:

“‘Some scientists think that visualizing is not necessary, but we want to communicate the fundamental questions that people have: where are we in the universe, what is the fate of the universe,’ says Brian Abbott, Manager of the Digital Universe for the last decade at the Hayden Planetarium. ‘This tool helps.'”

one hour out
2012 Update: This new video annotates a portion of the Known Universe, layer by layer, as the camera pulls farther and farther out into space.

Follow this up with Laniakea: Our home supercluster.

Related visualization videos include:
β€’ Powers of Ten (1977) by Charles and Ray Eames
β€’ Powers of Ten, updated with today’s science and technology
β€’Β To Scale: TIME, a short film that visualizes 13.8 billion years

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