The Kid Should See This

The beautiful physics and math of sneezes

If you don’t cover your mouth when you sneeze—sending it into the inside of your elbow, if not a tissue—that sneeze and the germs within it are explosively set free into the surrounding area. But where do the droplets travel and how far can they reach? No one had done much research into the physics of sneezes and coughs… until now:

To address this knowledge gap, Lydia Bourouiba and John Bush of MIT’s Applied Mathematics Lab used high speed cameras and fluid mechanics to reveal why we’ve grossly underestimated the role of gas clouds in these violent expirations.

sneeze
From Science Friday, this is really Nothing to Sneeze At.

Follow that video with this Schlieren imaging clip of a man breathing and coughing…

In the archives: Catching Up with the Flu, How A Virus Invades Your Body, and more Schlieren imaging in What Does Sound Look Like?

This award-winning video collection is reader-supported. Become a sustaining member to keep TKSST online and free for everyone, including teachers and parents who use it as a resource to spark learning and curiosity for kids.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

Schlieren flow visualizations: What Does Sound Look Like?

Rion Nakaya

The Hidden Complexities of the Simple Match – Science Take

Rion Nakaya

Social Distancing with mouse traps and ping pong balls

Rion Nakaya

Demonstrations of the Coanda Effect

Rion Nakaya

Proper Handwashing, an animation

Rion Nakaya

“Plain old soap and water absolutely annihilate coronavirus.” – Vox

Rion Nakaya

Geronimo! What you might not see in a drop of water

Rion Nakaya

How does your immune system work?

Rion Nakaya

Catching Up With Flu: Using the Web as an early warning signal

Rion Nakaya

Get smart curated videos delivered every week.    
Subscribe