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‘Big Ben’ clock tower made with 17,144 magnetic balls

With 17,144 multicolor magnetic balls, YouTuber Magnetic Games carefully creates a magnetic Elizabeth Tower or clock tower, popularly known as Big Ben, which is the nickname for the Great Bell within the historic tower. Sheets of the tiny magnetic balls are peeled apart and clicked into place as the miniature British monument comes together in this six minute video.

elizabeth tower clock
elizabeth tower
Some history from Parliament.uk:

The Elizabeth Tower, which stands at the north end of the Houses of Parliament, was completed in 1859 and the Great Clock started on 31 May, with the Great Bell’s strikes heard for the first time on 11 July and the quarter bells first chimed on 7 September.

Elizabeth Tower - Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay
Watch these next: Neodymium magnet collisions filmed in slow motion, ‘Making’ magnetic sculptures, more towers and more monuments.

Bonus: Painting and erasing a clock in real-time.

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