Get smart curated videos delivered to your inbox every week.      
The Kid Should See This

The Sticky Feet of Ants & Cockroaches – Cambridge Ideas

Have you ever watched an ant walk up a wall? Have you seen one upside down on a ledge while carrying something? How do insect feet stick like that?! Get a very close look at the minuscule foot anatomy of ants and cockroaches with Chris Clemente of Cambridge University:

Ants have incredibly sticky feet. With them they can hang onto ceilings, while carrying 100 times their body weight. But if they are stuck down so successfully – how do they ever get them unstuck? Chris Clemente is studying the mechanisms that ants and other insects (especially cockroaches) use to stick and unstick, and also to walk down as well as up walls. He also considers the applications that this might one day help to develop a ‘supersuper glue’ and to improve the movement of robots.

ants and sticky feet
We love seeing how animals’ bodies work. Beyond the wonder of biodiversity, imagine how nature’s variations can inform, improve, and redefine our inventions. File under: biomimicry, biomechanics, and locomotion.

via @aatishb & @bug_gwen.

🌈 Related videos

Carnivorous Plants and Killer Ants – Gross Science

Rion Nakaya

Scott Weaver’s Rolling through the Bay: 35 years + 100k toothpicks

Rion Nakaya

How to make Leonardo da Vinci’s self-supporting bridge

Rion Nakaya

The Leaproach

Rion Nakaya

Stanford’s µTug microrobots can pull a car

Rion Nakaya

Why 10 Daily Tons of Ant Poop Keep This Rainforest Thriving

Rion Nakaya

Gravity-defying acrobatics set to Clair de lune

Rion Nakaya

Stanford’s MicroTug robot can pull 2,000x its weight on glass

Rion Nakaya

Her Shoes – Everynone

Rion Nakaya

Get 7 smart videos delivered every week.

 

Subscribe