The Kid Should See This

What is a comet made of? Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club demonstrates

What makes up a comet? It’s like a dirty snowball, but not. To simulate the ingredients of a comet, start with some water, carbon, sand, alcohol, and dry ice. Squeeze it together and see the incredible result.

Professor Mark Miodownik mixes the makings of one together with comedians Dara Ó Briain and Mark Steel in this episode from Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club. Plus, from Space.com:

The solid nucleus or core of a comet consists mostly of ice and dust coated with dark organic material, according to NASA, with the ice composed mainly of frozen water but perhaps other frozen substances as well, such as ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane. The nucleus may have a small rocky core.

comet
making a comet
Related infographic: What’s the Difference Between a Comet, Asteroid and Meteor?

Plus, watch these videos on TKSST:
• Space Rocks: Comets, asteroids, meteors, and meteorites
• The Rosetta Mission, a claymation tale of science & adventure
• Rosetta spacecraft, Philae lander, & an animated history of comets
A time lapse of Comet Lovejoy and

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