Get smart curated videos delivered to your inbox every week.      
The Kid Should See This

DISHDANCE, a time lapse for The Skyglow Project

Created for The Skyglow Project, an astrophotography book and time lapse series by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic, DISHDANCE observes massive radio telescopes during the day and night. The project also captures starscapes and the effects of light pollution. Via Wikipedia:

Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects at radio frequencies. The initial detection of radio waves from an astronomical object was made in the 1930s, when Karl Jansky observed radiation coming from the Milky Way. Subsequent observations have identified a number of different sources of radio emission. These include stars and galaxies, as well as entirely new classes of objects, such as radio galaxies, quasars, pulsars, and masers. The discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation, regarded as evidence for the Big Bang theory, was made through radio astronomy.

The time lapse footage was taken at three different locations: Very Large Array (VLA) Observatory in New Mexico, Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) in Owens Valley, California, and Green Bank Observatory (GBT) in West Virginia.

Watch more telescope videos, more time lapse videos, and this: What happened to the Milky Way?

via Gizmodo.

This award-winning video collection is reader-supported. Become a sustaining member to keep TKSST online and free for everyone, including teachers and parents who use it as a resource to spark learning and curiosity for kids.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide

Rion Nakaya

Why every picture of a black hole is an illustration – Vox

Rion Nakaya

Star Parties In Our National Parks: Parks After Dark

Rion Nakaya

A night time lapse of Comet Lovejoy

Rion Nakaya

Why Do We Put Telescopes in Space? – MinutePhysics

Rion Nakaya

Voyage To the Core, a 4K Milky Way time lapse

Rion Nakaya

Comet NEOWISE from ISS, a calming real-time view

Rion Nakaya

Why are moths obsessed with lamps?

Rion Nakaya

POLI’AHU, a time lapse at Mauna Kea’s Astronomical Observatories

Rion Nakaya