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The Kid Should See This

Embroidered zoetrope animations by Elliot Schultz

From 3D printing, to sculpting and painting, to the production of posable toys, there are so many ways to make the spinning animation devices known as zoetropes. As a Digital Art Major at the Australian National University, Elliot Schultz experimented with and produced embroidered zoetrope animations. Get a behind-the-scenes look here.

Discs were created with animated sequences embroidered onto their surface. They have been designed to be played on standard turntables and their shape and size is inherited from 10″ vinyl records. The animation is activated when a strobe light illuminates the discs in sync with the embroidered frames of animation.

We love zoetropes. Take a look at our two favorite animations from the project:

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Watch this next: Pixar’s Zoetrope and how animation works.

via Colossal.

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