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The Kid Should See This

Engineering the Perfect Pop

Using scissors, tape, and reams of creativity, Matthew Reinhart engineers paper to bend, fold, and transform into fantastic creatures, structures and locales. By adjusting the angles of folds and the depth of layers, Reinhart animates his subjects to tell dramatic stories that literally pop off the page.

From Science Friday: Engineering the Perfect Pop. Plus, check out Reinhart’s pop-up books on Amazon.

Want to make your own pop-up? Start here: Easy paper card pop-up tutorials for kids. Then find more inspiration in these videos.

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