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Five unique at-home science experiments with Physics Girl

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Jello and lasers. Aluminum cans and sharpies. Balloons, water, and candles. The color milk experiment but with water or oil. Glowing Band-Aid wrappers?! What’s going on with these unique at-home science experiments?

This fact- and pun-filled physics video from Dianna Cowern of the Physics Girl YouTube channel features five fascinating science experiments that are super engaging for home or in class. Science safely! A few of the experiments should include adult supervision and safety goggles.

Explore the scattering of light and reflection, aluminum fatigue, stretchy materials and balloon skewers, water’s heat capacity, triboluminescence and Band-Aids or plasters, and surface tension.

laser through jello
Watch these excellent Physics Girl DIY experiment videos next:
• Seven surface tension experiments
• The Stacked Ball Drop (and Supernovas)
How to Make a Cloud in Your Mouth
How to make a Crazy Pool Vortex

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