The Kid Should See This

Haruki Nakamura’s surprising paper karakuri animals

Japanese paper crafter Haruki Nakamura designs mechanical paper karakuri animals that peek and pop in surprising ways. Karakuri, meaning ‘trick’ or ‘mechanism’, are mechanical automata pieces that were first made in Japan during the 17th century. Nakamura’s craft mixes that tradition with kirigami, an art that combines paper cutting with origami or paper folding.

Above, a sheep in wolf’s clothing. Below, a surprised octopus:

Zombie domino:

Biting wolf v2:

Surprised armadillo:

And Wooden Penguin Bomb, which shows part of the hidden mechanism that helps the penguin pop:

Make your own mechanical paper creatures via Nakamura’s online shop (if you’re in Japan) or get creative with Karakuri: How to Make Mechanical Paper Models That Move and Japanese Paper Toys Kit: Origami Paper Toys that Walk, Jump, Spin, Tumble and Amaze!

Next: Minesaki Sougo’s Tumbling doll, Curious Contraptions by automata artist Paul Spooner, and this DIY popsicle stick chain reaction.

via The Automata / Automaton Group.

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