The Kid Should See This

How do solar panels work?

The Earth intercepts a lot of solar power: 173,000 terawatts. That’s 10,000 times more power than the planet’s population uses. So is it possible that one day the world could be completely reliant on solar energy?

Find out how solar panels convert solar energy to electrical energy in this TED Ed lesson by Richard Komp with animation by Globizco. Plus, from The Guardian in March 2017:

New solar photovoltaic capacity installed in 2016 reached more than 76 gigawatts, a dramatic increase on the 50GW installed the year before. China and the US led the surge, with both countries almost doubling the amount of solar they added in 2015, according to data compiled by Europe’s solar power trade body.

Globally there is now 305GW of solar power capacity, up from around 50GW in 2010 and virtually nothing at the turn of the millennium.

Related reading: How much space would it take to sustain the world’s largest cities by solar energy?

Related videos: Stanford Solar Car Project and fourth graders that created a solar powered classroom. Plus, watch 24/7 Concentrated Solar Thermal Power + Molten Salt Storage, plastic bottle water wheel power generator experiment, and climbing wind turbines for a living.

This feature is being tested. Saves will disappear if you clear cookies. Find saved videos here.

🌈 Related videos

Fourth graders create a solar powered classroom

Rion Nakaya

An innovative edible spoon, a smart alternative to plastic waste

Rion Nakaya

Solar and potential energy ‘swing thing’ mini machines

Rion Nakaya

Cook food using the sun’s heat: Build a solar oven

Rion Nakaya

The Solar Grandmothers of Ambakivao, Madagascar

Rion Nakaya

Glowing, all-weather bicycle: Firefly by Geospace Studio

Rion Nakaya

A full sized LEGO car with an air-powered engine

Rion Nakaya

Barn Owls: The Secret Saviors of Napa Valley’s Vineyards

Rion Nakaya

Crow herding with urban falconry in Portland

Rion Nakaya

 
Browse the TKSST Video Collections

Get 7 smart videos delivered every week.

 

Subscribe