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Meccano Rope-Making Machine

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Engineered with metal strips, plates, angle girders, spools, chains, axles, gears, nuts, and bolts, this rope-making machine twists three strands of string into a rope. Built by Meccano enthusiast Peter Ashby, the machine is featured on the London Meccano Club’s YouTube Channel. A bit of history on the toy:

The ideas for Meccano were first conceived by [Frank] Hornby in 1898 and he developed and patented the construction kit as “Mechanics Made Easy” in 1901. The name was later changed to “Meccano” and manufactured by the British company, Meccano Ltd, between 1908 and 1980. It is now manufactured in France and China by Meccano S.N. of France, part of the Canadian Spin Master toy company. In the USA, Meccano is sold under the Erector Set brand.

Bonus Meccano machines: “The Revolution” Ferris Wheel by Santiago Plicio and the Rubik’s Cube Solver by David Couch.

More rope making: How To Make Rope From Grass and Edwardian Farm: Making rope from sisel fiber.

via The Awesomer.

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