The Kid Should See This

NASA simulates how dust, smoke, and sea salt have traveled the planet

Watch as sea salt, dust, and smoke—aerosol particles traveling on the winds—have moved across our planet in 2017. This animated simulation, “based on both satellite observations and computer models that use physical equations to simulate reality,” was created by a team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. From the video notes:

Hurricanes are visible due to salt whipped up into the air off the ocean surface. The obvious source of dust is the Sahara Desert. The amazing thing, besides the utter beauty of this simulation, is just how far these particles travel. The world is a complex system where every piece interacts with every other piece. Models and observations like these are used to understand that better, and to better understand our drastically changing climate.

Read more about it on Phil Plait’s blog at SyFy.

Related watching: Satellite Tracks Saharan Dust to Amazon in 3-D. Plus: One Year on Earth – Seen From 1 Million Miles, What Does Earth Look Like From Space? An Astronaut’s Perspective, and Engines of Destruction: The Science of Hurricanes.

via Kottke.

This award-winning video collection is reader-supported. Become a sustaining member to keep TKSST online and free for everyone, including teachers and parents who use it as a resource to spark learning and curiosity for kids.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

Revealing the true scale of the universe with VFX

Rion Nakaya

Slingshots of the Oceanic

Rion Nakaya

A 2.5-minute tour of the galaxy

Rion Nakaya

All That Glitters: The History of Shiny Things

Rion Nakaya

Building the solar system to scale in the Nevada desert

Rion Nakaya

Planet Earth in 4K: Time lapse images taken by an orbiting satellite

Rion Nakaya

A Fictive Flight Above Real Mars

Rion Nakaya

Real life Tetris: Jazz + hailstones make beautiful, intricate patterns

Rion Nakaya

Stephen Hawking explains black holes in 90 seconds

Rion Nakaya

Get smart curated videos delivered every week.    
Subscribe