The Kid Should See This

One Year on Earth – Seen From 1 Million Miles

Every two hours, NASA’s Epic camera on NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite captures a set of images from its L1 (Lagrange point 1) orbit. The images of Earth’s sunlit side are taken in ten different wavelengths. The first color-adjusted image was seen in July of 2015. Now, one year later, we can see an entire year of what our planet looks like from around one million miles away… including a glimpse of the moon’s shadow during the March 2016 total solar eclipse.

Read more about our Deep Space Climate Observatory here. Related reading via Kottke: Lagrangian or ‘L’ points — “where the gravitational forces and the orbital motion of the spacecraft, Sun and planet interact to create a stable location from which to make observations.”

Next: What Does Earth Look Like From Space? An Astronaut’s Perspective.

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