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The Kid Should See This

Patrick Dougherty’s Stickwork in Salem and Sausalito

Are they nests? Cocoons, forts, beehives, ancient huts, forest castles? All of the above and more? From the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, watch how artist Patrick Dougherty planned and built ‘What the Birds Know‘, PEM’s first environmental art installation. The intertwined tree saplings came together in mid-2015 with the help of volunteers:

Dougherty has woven over 200 of these architectural sculptures all over the globe. This time lapse video of his ‘Peekaboo Palace‘ installation at the Bay Area Discovery Museum in Sausalito, California gives an all-weather overview of how they come together. File under: DIY inspiration.

Related reading: Stickwork, Dougherty’s first monograph.

Explore more installations via video: Red PaperBridge, Beam Drop Inhotim, The Chandelier Tree, and Motoi Yamamoto’s intricate, temporary salt installations.

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