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The Kid Should See This

Raindrops: What do they really look like?

When you draw raindrops, how do you draw them? Are they tear-shaped with the point at their tops? Is that really what raindrops look like? Dr. Joe Hanson asked that very question. He then tested what happened to water drops inside a vertical wind tunnel.

It turns out that teardrop-shaped rain is physically impossible. What’s possible? Spheres, burger buns, pancakes, and parachutes. He shows us what that means, and he goes indoor skydiving, in this It’s Okay to Be Smart video: What Do Raindrops Really Look Like?

Next, watch more about rain and more videos about all kinds of drops, including a coalescence cascade, a Leidenfrost Maze, catching fog to help combat Peru’s water shortage, and what makes that fresh rain smell?

Bonus: Incredible indoor skydiving flyers at the 2017 Wind Games.

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