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The Kid Should See This

Rock Swing Cup & more DIY playground physics

Next time you’re on the swings, think about what it might be like if you were swinging on the moon, free from air resistance. AP Physics teacher Jared Keester had that in mind during this experiment: Swing jumping with a rock and a plastic cup to see how each encounters that air resistance here on Earth.

Related videos: The Apollo 15 Hammer and Feather Drop on the moon (1971) — the video Keester references — and this beautiful BBC recreation: The Hammer-Feather Drop in the world’s biggest vacuum chamber.

Plus, watch two more DIY Professor Keester demos that are easy for kids to try at home on their own – A water tornado and a slinky wave:

Check out more videos with vortices, slinkys, and falling stuff.

via @ThePhysicsGirl.

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