The Kid Should See This

Surface tension and The Cheerios Effect

Ever notice how cereal clumps up in your bowl, or how cereal sticks to the edges of the bowl? Bubbles in beverages do the same thing. You’ve probably seen this surface tension and buoyancy at work, but did you know there’s some mind-blowing science behind it? What we learn in our cereal bowl even connects to the lives of tiny insects that walk on water.

Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart explains The Cheerios Effect, a phenomenon in fluid mechanics that you can explore the next time you’re eating cereal. Related reading: Meniscus.

Next: Nature’s Scuba Divers – How Beetles Breathe Underwater, Seven surface tension experiments, and Stroke Of The Water Strider.

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