The Kid Should See This

What is surface tension? Ask a water strider.

Modern technologies like high speed cameras can allow us to see what was previously ‘invisible’ to the naked eye. This clip from Richard Hammond’s Invisible Worlds provides two memorable slow motion examples: A speedy water strider skating on the water’s surface and a drop of milk in water. “It has to do with the elastic property of the water surface, a phenomenon called surface tension.”

Follow this video with these: Seven DIY surface tension experiments, Surface Tension and The Cheerios Effect, Stroke Of The Water Strider, and Flottille: Unfolding micro-origami.

Plus: What is the fastest accelerator on the planet?

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