Get smart curated videos delivered to your inbox every week.      
The Kid Should See This

Tantalus Mackerel and a School of Fish automata

Automata and kinetic sculpture artist Chris Fitch uses engineering to create repeated moments in time. Named for the Greek mythological figure Tantalus, the fish-themed piece above, Tantalus Mackerel, follows a frustrated fish trying to catch a bug. The piece is accompanied by Maria Callas singing O mio babbino caro from Giacomo Puccini‘s Gianni Schicchi.

Fitch also recently refurbished his 1993 piece School of Fish, seen below.

Inspired by the works of Alexander Calder and American folk art generally, this piece is largely made from litho-tin cans that had contained fish in them (i.e. sardines, tuna, and anchovies), some of which are no longer available, having been replaced by paper labels.


Watch these automata videos next: Curious Contraptions by automata artist Paul Spooner, Haruki Nakamura’s surprising paper karakuri animals, and The Silver Swan. Plus: Videos featuring gears.

🌈 Related videos

Computational Design of Mechanical Characters

Rion Nakaya

Marian Anderson’s ‘defiant performance’ at the Lincoln Memorial

Rion Nakaya

Mechanical singing bird box automata of the 1700s

Rion Nakaya

Mekanikos vs. The Minotaur, a charming wooden machine

Rion Nakaya

Walking mechanical woman and man

Rion Nakaya

Automata artist Matt Smith and his Curious Contraptions

Rion Nakaya

GE’s Six Second Science Fair, a compilation

Rion Nakaya

An Automaton of Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player

Rion Nakaya

Rowland Emett’s Marvelous Dream Machines

Rion Nakaya

Get 7 smart videos delivered every week.

 

Subscribe