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Tape Paris: Crawl through suspended tunnels of translucent tape

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Translucent, cocoon-like tunnels made from 42,672 meters (140,000 feet) of packing tape are stretched and suspended 6 meters (20 feet) up above the great entrance hall of Paris’ Palais de Tokyo. Just a few at a time, visitors can step, slide, climb, and crawl their way through these biomorphic passages.

Tape Paris is the latest installation by art and design collective Numen/For Use, who have built other climbable tape structures in Tokyo, Frankfurt, and Melbourne. It took ten days for a team of twelve people to wrap the tape and plastic film into the maze of tunnels that are both primordial and futuristic.

NumenTapeParis960-IMG5248
Listen to the tunnels crackle:


The installation closes on January 11, 2015. See more behind the scenes photos at Numen.eu, as well as this time lapse of the Tape Tokyo installation:

Related watching: Bernard Pras’ anamorphic portrait of Ferdinand Cheval, The Event of a Thread, Metropolis II at LACMA, and Motoi Yamamoto’s intricate, temporary salt installations.

via FastCo Design.

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