The Kid Should See This

The Blind Astronomer of Nova Scotia

Tim Doucette is legally blind, yet he sees the stars better than most people. A childhood diagnosis of congenital cataracts forced doctors to remove Doucette’s lenses and widen his pupils. That left the amateur astronomer with only about 10 percent of his eyesight, but it also allows his pupils to pick up more light at night. You’ve never seen the night sky quite like Doucette.

From Great Big Story, this is The Blind Astronomer of Nova Scotia.

Watch more videos about the night, our eyes, and visual impairment, starting with how eyes work & how glasses help us see, close ups of the human eye, Emily’s Oz, How Many Stars Are There? and What happened to the Milky Way?

Bonus: Thailand’s Moken people have incredibly clear underwater vision.

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