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Entomophagy: The Economist looks at why eating insects makes sense

Healthier to eat, less expensive to produce, and more sustainable than traditional livestock, insects are a popular recommendation as a global food supply solution. Around two billion people eat bugs as a snack or as part of their meals. On entomophagy, The Guardian reports:

More than 1,000 insects are known to be eaten by choice around the world, in 80% of nations. They are most popular in the tropics, where they grow to large sizes and are easy to harvest…

The advantages of this diet include insects’ high levels of protein, vitamin and mineral content… Breeding commonly eaten insects such as locusts, crickets and meal worms, emits 10 times less methane than livestock. The insects also produce 300 times less nitrous oxide, also a warming gas, and much less ammonia, a pollutant produced by pig and poultry farming.

Chili-toasted grasshoppers! Cricket stir-fries! Scorpions on stick! Or try some mealworm flour in your chocolate chip cookies!

Related reading: The New York Times suggests some bugs you can eat, and National Geographic recommends 8 bugs to try.

Related watching: The Edible Insects Food Movement.

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