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The Pythagorean theorem water demo

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Pythag_animThe Pythagorean theorem water demo: See the two smaller squares of water on the two shorter sides of a right triangle pour perfectly and equally into the area of the larger square on the longer side, known as the hypotenuse.

This video demonstrates the Pythagorean theorem, a² + b² = c², as does this animated proof of rearrangement on the right. In fact, the Pythagorean theorem, might have more known proofs than any other mathematical theorem.

Recreate it with LEGO. The blue square is a, the red square is b, and the yellow square is c. How can you rearrange the bricks to prove the theorem?

Pythagorean-theorem-LEGO

Previously featured videos in math: The mathematical secrets of Pascal’s triangle, the Matchstick Triangle Puzzle, and the Fold & Cut Theorem.

via Kottke.

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