TKSST is taking a short summer break. Become a member to support our August return
The Kid Should See This

Where does Space begin?

How far away is Space from where you are right now? How much closer is it when you’re flying in a plane? And how close is the International Space Station to Earth if we can spot it in the sky?

Travel up, up, up towards space to find out what we’d see at different heights in this animated explainer by Slurpy Studios for the Royal Observatory Greenwich. Plus, from NOAA.gov:

A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. In theory, once this 100 km line is crossed, the atmosphere becomes too thin to provide enough lift for conventional aircraft to maintain flight. At this altitude, a conventional plane would need to reach orbital velocity or risk falling back to Earth.

Kármán line
Related reading: Where, exactly, is the edge of space? It depends on who you ask.

Related listening with Vermont Public Radio’s But Why? podcast for curious kids: Where does the sky end?

Watch these related videos next: Space Rocks: Comets, asteroids, meteors, & meteorites, How do we measure the universe? and How does the Earth’s gravity help keep satellites in orbit? Plus: More videos about measuring.

This Webby award-winning video collection exists to help teachers, librarians, and families spark kid wonder and curiosity. TKSST features smarter, more meaningful content than what's usually served up by YouTube's algorithms, and amplifies the creators who make that content.

Curated, kid-friendly, independently-published. Support this mission by becoming a sustaining member today.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

What is light? Royal Observatory Greenwich explains…

Rion Nakaya

NASA’s Guide To Black Hole Safety

Rion Nakaya

How shadows on other worlds would behave differently than on Earth

Rion Nakaya

Are there aliens out there?

Rion Nakaya

How Far Can We Go? Limits of Humanity – Kurzgesagt

Rion Nakaya

Space Rocks: Comets, asteroids, meteors, and meteorites

Rion Nakaya

Newton’s Three Laws of Motion

Rion Nakaya

The science of solar eclipses: How do solar & lunar eclipses work?

Rion Nakaya

How Big is the Moon? A Kurzgesagt visualization

Rion Nakaya