The Kid Should See This

Why do carrots taste sweeter in the winter?

From the University of California’s Fig.1 series, Molecular Biologist Liz Roth-Johnson explains why cold weather makes carrots taste more sweet:

Because plants are immobile, they must develop defense techniques against predators and the severe cold in winter. For example, carrots have developed the physiological response of increasing their sugar content when it’s cold outside. This helps stop ice crystal formations and prevents damage to the carrot’s cells.

Frost can do a lot of damage to a plant cell. It can squeeze and rupture the cells until they are completely demolished. But in some cases, the plant’s defense mechanism means a tastier vegetable for us to eat. When a carrot defends itself from frost, we get the benefit of enjoying sweeter carrots all winter long.

Related videos include Minute Earth’s How do trees survive winter? and The Story of Frozen Food, as well as Fig 1’s How Mountain Biking Was Invented.

This award-winning video collection is reader-supported. Become a sustaining member to keep TKSST online and free for everyone, including teachers and parents who use it as a resource to spark learning and curiosity for kids.

🌈 Watch these videos next...

Brooklyn’s Eagle Street Rooftop Farm

Rion Nakaya

Frozen Soap Bubbles: Ice crystal ‘snow globes’ by ZALUSKArt

Rion Nakaya

Melting backwards: Frozen

Rion Nakaya

Cauliflower: How Does it Grow?

Rion Nakaya

Real life Tetris: Jazz + hailstones make beautiful, intricate patterns

Rion Nakaya

Growing food for the animals in Paignton Zoo’s Vertical Farm

Rion Nakaya

The Birth of a Snowflake (A snowflake melts in reverse)

Rion Nakaya

Asparagus-Stuffed Semolina Gnocchi Casserole

Rion Nakaya

Demolishing an old hut to plant cassava and yams

Rion Nakaya

Get smart curated videos delivered every week.    
Subscribe