The Kid Should See This

Wolves: How do we solve the problem of predators?

Humans don’t have a great track record of coexisting with top predators, and wolves are no exception. By the early 1900s, wolves were nearly extinct in all of Western Europe as a result of government programs that rewarded people for killing them. While the animals’ population numbers dwindled, humans got used to life without them—despite the fact that their status as top predators meant that they had a positive impact on the ecosystem. Can we save wolves, or will they fall prey to us?

It’s a challenge that countries around the globe have faced for generations. Learn more about wolf conservation in Norway with this animated explainer from The Atlantic.

wolf conservation in norway
wolves vs farms in norway
Related reading: List of gray wolf populations by country, a timeline of the fight for northern rocky gray wolves, and Mexican gray wolves and red wolves: Unique species.

Next, watch more videos about conservation, Bunnies and Wolves: An animal adventure in New York, and Why Dogs Have Floppy Ears, an animated tale.

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