Topic: bones

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Triceratops vs Torosaurus

From CalAcademy and the University of California Museum of Paleontology, a great introduction on how the Triceratops (named in 1889) and the Torosaurus (named in 1891) are actually the same dinosaur at dif...

3D Printing Dinosaurs: The mad science of new paleontology

File under laser scanners, 3D printers and dinosaur bones… not so surprisingly a great combination, as introduced by Dr. Kenneth Lacovara of Drexel University: "For years and years, vertebr...

What’s the difference between horns and antlers?

What’s the difference between horns and antlers? The Brain Scoop's Emily Graslie explains.

How did feathers evolve? – TED Ed

In this beautifully illustrated lesson from TED Ed, science writer and educator Carl Zimmer explains some answers to the question, How did feathers evolve? From his article in National Geographic: Most of us will n...

Seahorse’s Armor Gives Engineers Insight Into Robotics Designs

What can we learn from a tiny seahorse that might help us make stronger robotics or armor in the future? UCSD Materials Science Ph.D. student Michael Porter explains what his team has learne...

Anatomy of Preservation: From a Specimen to an Object of Study

How do zoologists learn about the anatomy of different animals? And how do they display these specimens in the museums for us to observe and learn from? Watch the detailed deconstruction and reconstruction of a Jamaic...

Them Not-So-Dry Bones – Schoolhouse Rock

Ligaments, cartilage, muscles, and tendons all need our skeletons. And so do we! It’s Schoolhouse Rock's Them Not-So-Dry Bones, animated in 1979.

How Do You Dismantle a Dino? (Very Carefully)

We've learned a lot about dinosaur anatomy since displays of their bones were set up at The National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., "anywhere from the early 1900s through 1940s, 50s, and 60s." As a par...

Dreadnoughtus: A New Dinosaur Discovery

Fossils from one of the largest dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth -- the 77-million-year-old, 65-ton Dreadnoughtus (meaning "fear nothing") schrani -- were discovered and unearthed in Southern Patagonia, Argentina, bet...

Bigger Than T. Rex: Spinosaurus

The water-loving Spinosaurus had a spiny "sail" on its back, and a crocodile-like head, neck and tail, but was much larger than the Tyrannosaurus Rex. At 50 feet long, it's the largest carnivore to walk (and swim) the...

Maggot to Fly Time Lapse Transformation

A maggot transforms within a pupa and a fly emerges in this Maggot to Fly Transformation video, filmed by Ammonite Films. Watch as an inflatable head sac called a ptilinum helps push the fly out of the puparium, a see...

Shelf Life: 33 Million Things at the American Museum of Natural History

What if you could open up a drawer full of hundreds of pinned insect specimens to study them under a microscope, or unscrew the jar cap to scan a curious creature that swam in the deep sea decades ago? For collectors ...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Turtles and Taxonomy

The science of classification, specifically the biological taxonomy of organisms, organizes how humans see and study the life that surrounds us. For museum-goers, observing a turtle skull, seaweed leaves, or a cabinet...

Shelf Life: Six Ways To Prepare a Coelacanth

The Coelacanth, pronounced see-luh-kanth, is a prehistoric-looking fish that scientists thought had gone extinct 66 to 80 million years ago, until one was discovered in a fisherman's haul near the Chalumna River by So...

Skull of the Olinguito – AMNH: Shelf Life

How was a ninety year old specimen "hiding in plain sight" before it was rescued from storage at The Field Museum and celebrated in 2013 as a newly-identified species? This episode of The American Museum of Natural Hi...

Why Warm Blood is Better Than Cold – Rise of the Mammals

What does a tiny Hadrocodium wui fossil tell us about the evolutionary advantages that mammals were developing before the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction event that finished off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago...

Deep in the caves with Homo Naledi & the Rising Star Expedition

More than 1,500 individual bones and teeth of at least 15 skeletons of Homo naledi were excavated by an all-woman "underground astronaut" team during the 2013/14 Rising Star Expedition. Homo naledi is a new species in...

Woolly mammoth remains discovered in a Michigan field

Farmer James Bristle discovered the remains of a woolly mammoth in his newly acquired soy field near Chelsea, Michigan. In this video from the University of Michigan, you can see the skull and tusks being lifted from ...

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