Topic: cells

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Scallops have lots of tiny eyes that act like tiny telescopes

Things you may not know about the marine bivalve molluscs called Pectinidae or scallops, as seen in the Hakai Institute video above: 1. They can swim freely for short distances to escape predators or relocate them...

How To Grow Coral

When visitors at Georgia Aquarium gaze upon the diverse array of colorful corals, [biologist Kim] Stone says many mistake the often stationary specimens for beautiful rocks. But corals are actually living animals—they...

What is dust made of?

Less than a tenth the size of an ant, a dust mite’s whole world is contained in the dusty film under a bed or in a forgotten corner. This realm is right under our noses, but from our perspective, the tiny specks of br...

The Science of Skin

Between you and the rest of the world lies an interface that makes up 16% of your physical weight. This is your skin, the largest organ in your body: laid out flat, it would cover close to 1.7 square metres of ground....

Why Dogs Have Floppy Ears, an animated tale

Why do some breeds of dogs have floppy ears? Charles Darwin asked this question in his 1868 book The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. And it's not just the ears of dogs. The ears, snout lengths, fu...

How does your immune system work?

The immune system is a vast network of cells, tissues, and organs that coordinate your body’s defenses against any threats to your health. Without it, you’d be exposed to billions of bacteria, viruses, and toxins that...

How glow-in-the-dark jellyfish inspired a scientific revolution

In science, ideas are kind of like seeds. If you're lucky, a seed will grow and expand the boundaries of human knowledge. But it's hard to know which seeds will take root. Take any invention or modern innovation and i...

How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

Australia's Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world and the only living structure visible from space. Although ecosystem managers in Australia have worked hard to preserve the reefs, the past ...

Oxygen’s surprisingly complex journey through your body

Oxygen forms about 21% of the air around us. In your body, oxygen forms a vital role in the production of energy in most cells. But if gases can only efficiently diffuse across tiny distances, how does oxygen reach th...

Cell division in a frog egg, a microscopic time lapse video

In a feat of DIY time lapse filmmaking at a microscopic scale, wildlife filmmaker and photographer Francis Chee captured the cell division of a Rana temporaria common frog egg. Watch it transform from a few cells to.....

Crafting Cell Diagrams

Create your own cells with science enthusiast and STEM education advocate Ella K. Chan. In 2013, at the age of 12, she began sharing science activities for kids on her Sci Files YouTube channel. In this activity, she ...

The Snail-Smashing, Fish-Spearing, Eye-Popping Mantis Shrimp

The mantis shrimp is a fascinating creature. One kind impales prey with a spear-like appendage and another smashes prey with a built-in club — the fastest attack in the animal kingdom. "At 30 times faster than the bli...

What Really Causes Sunburns?

Why does your skin turn red and peel when you get a sunburn? In this episode of Gross Science, Anna Rothschild explains what's going on in our skin when it burns from sun exposure.

Hunting for microbes in Central Park’s murkiest waters

Follow biologist Sally Warring into New York City's Central Park as she collects water samples from fountains and ponds to find instagrammable microbes. From her site PondLife.com: All free-living life forms are m...

How Old Is Your Body, Really?

Have you ever heard the statement that the cells in your body are completely replaced every seven years? Is this true? In this beautifully illustrated episode of Skunk Bear, NPR's Adam Cole explores how long our diffe...

Explaining The Tree of Life

Travel millions of years through time with Sir David Attenborough as he explains The Tree of Life. Some background on the metaphor from The New York Times: In his 1859 book “On the Origin of Species,” Charles Darw...

Why do some people have seasonal allergies?

If you've ever experienced watery eyes, sneezing, runny nose, itchy throat, and other allergic reactions during springtime, or you haven't but you know someone who has, this beautifully animated TED Ed by Eleanor Nels...

The Science of Skin Color – TED Ed

When ultraviolet sunlight hits our skin, it affects each of us differently. Depending on skin color, it’ll take only minutes of exposure to turn one person beetroot-pink, while another requires hours to experience the...

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