Topic: science

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Butterflies and bees drinking turtle tears in the Peruvian Amazon

Why are these butterflies and bees swarming around turtle faces? In this episode of the Jungle Diaries, entomologist Phil Torres sees a rare sight in the Peruvian Amazon: Tear-drinking butterflies and bees. The behavi...

Pyrotechnics pro Jim Souza explains the art of a massive fireworks show

How do pyrotechnics experts stage professional fireworks shows for holidays and events like the Macy's July 4th Spectacular and both the 100th and 125th anniversaries of the Statue of Liberty? In this Wired video, fou...

Firefly Experience: Lightning bugs light the Iowa woods

Walk the woods near Fairfield, Iowa as the fireflies come out to sparkle and glow at twilight. Photographer Radim Schreiber sees the sparkling forest as reflection of the stars in the Milky Way and has been filming t...

The Science Of Firework Color

Sodium in yellow bursts, strontium in red, calcium gives us orange, barium for green, and copper for blue hues... and there are more where those came from. The science of firework color, as explained above by SkunkBea...

The Wood Wide Web: How trees secretly talk to and share with each other

Trees secretly talk to each other underground. They're passing information and resources to and from each other through a network of mycorrhizal fungi—mykós means fungus and riza means root in Greek—a mat of long, thi...

It’s Okay to Fart: What are farts made of and why are they funny?

Farts can be giggle-worthy and gross, but every person on Earth farts, as well as lots of animals... so why don't we know more about them? Even people throughout history have wrestled with what farts are and how they ...

How do crab spiders use their silk to fly?

Some spiders can catch onto breezes that send them flying across oceans and high up into the skies by ballooning—releasing "numerous strands of silk that they spin up to six feet long." And those threads of silk, ...

A lemon-powered supercar and making the world’s largest lemon battery

Can you power an electric supercar with lemon-power? It depends on the lemon-power. In the video above, science YouTuber and former NASA JPL engineer Mark Rober attempts to fill a 48-kilowatt-hour battery with electri...

How is a nautilus different from a squid?

Nautiluses are amazing creatures. They've survived five mass extinctions and can learn and remember, as demonstrated in maze experiments. They're also cephalopods, but they do a lot of things differently from octopuse...

Observing the angle of repose with DIY physics devices

The angle of repose or critical angle of repose is how steep various types of materials can be piled without slumping. The steepness of the side of a pile is determined by the amount of friction between the particles ...

3D-printed structures that shape-shift with magnetic microparticles

These small, soft 3D-printed structures can shape-shift—expand, contract, wrinkle up, roll, and move about—thanks to the magnetic microparticles within their silicone-based rubber bodies. This is the latest iteration ...

The Science of Hearing

The ability to recognize sounds and identify their location is possible thanks to the auditory system. That’s comprised of two main parts: the ear, and the brain. The ear’s task is to convert sound energy into neural ...

The Cephalopod Empire in Woods Hole, Massachusetts

Bret Grasse lovingly calls the Cephalopod Operations division at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts the “cephalopod empire.” The lab houses roughly 2,000 to 3,000 cephalopods—likely th...

These tiny origami robot transformers use magnetic fields to walk, roll, sail, and glide

This small cube can transform into a walking, wheeling, boating, or gliding bot with the help of origami exoskeletons that fold around it to create a new form and function. These are tiny shape-shifting robots from re...

You’d Never Guess What an Acorn Woodpecker Eats – Deep Look

Acorn Woodpeckers eat insects, delicious sap, oak flowers full of pollen... and yes, acorns. They stock up on these bitter but dependable nuts from coast live oaks and California black oaks, storing them in tree trunk...

Making ice cream with Liquid Nitrogen and Dr. Kate Biberdorf

Dr. Kate Biberdorf is a lecturer and the Director of Demonstrations and Outreach at The University of Texas in Austin, and an internet famous chemist who creates impressive explosions for students all across Texas. In...

Sugar Rainbow, an easy density experiment

We've tried stacking rainbow layers before... but what if we only have water, sugar, and food coloring or coloring tablets to experiment with? Check out this Sugar Rainbow experiment, an easy way to learn about densit...

Fistful of Stars, a 360° experience through the lens of the Hubble Telescope

Travel from our home planet out into the cosmos with the Hubble Telescope, venturing into the heart of the Orion Nebula where a star is being born. This is Fistful of Stars, a short virtual reality (VR) film directed ...

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