Topic: vibration

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Kids Meet Opera Singer Angel Blue

Meet Angel Blue. She's an award-winning American operatic soprano, a singing voice that "has the highest vocal range of all voice types," who's performed all over the world. In this episode of Kids Meet, Angel Blue de...

How does sound travel to our brains?

How does a sound, like music played on a trumpet, travel from the source through our ears and to our brains? This animated video from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders describes the ...

A colorful Chladni pattern demonstration

Watch as Chladni patterns form on a metal plate, a teaching demonstration "spiced up" with colored sand by associate professor of physics at UNC Charlotte skullsinthestars. The video is accompanied by Prelude from Sui...

How Elephants Listen … With Their Feet

Thousands of elephants roam Etosha National Park in Namibia, a nation in southwest Africa, taking turns at the park’s numerous watering holes. The elephants exchange information by emitting low-frequency sounds that t...

The Science of Hearing

The ability to recognize sounds and identify their location is possible thanks to the auditory system. That’s comprised of two main parts: the ear, and the brain. The ear’s task is to convert sound energy into neural ...

How NASA’s InSight Will Plumb the Depths of Mars

Propelled by a predawn rocket launch from California, NASA’s InSight spacecraft is now on a voyage of some six months to Mars to study the deep interior of the red planet. “The science that we want to do with this ...

Making Artificial Earthquakes with a Four-Tonne Steel Ball

In Göttingen, Germany, there's a four-tonne steel ball that can be raised up a 14-metre tower -- and then dropped in less than two seconds, crashing back to earth. It makes tiny, artificial earthquakes. Tom Scott v...

The Sound of Ice: Skating on thin black ice makes sci-fi movie laser sounds

This small lake outside Stockholm, Sweden, emits otherworldly sounds as Mårten Ajne skates over its precariously thin, black ice. “Wild ice skating,” or “Nordic skating,” is both an art and a science. A skater seeks o...

“Balloons look really weird when they resonate.” – Steve Mould

What is the resonant frequency of a balloon? Steve Mould hooked up a balloon to a scientific vibration generator to find out. Resonating balloons look really odd on camera. What you see is a sort of slow motion. ...

Go inside an ice cave to see nature’s most beautiful blue

Where do glaciers and icebergs get their beautiful blue color? This unique blue might be nature’s most brilliant, and the color arises in a very special way thanks to some surprising interactions between light and wat...

Readying the Webb Telescope for Launch

Launching "the most sophisticated space science telescope ever constructed" into space is a complex process, and testing is a huge part of it. The James Webb Space Telescope's intricate hardware and technical systems ...

Invisible Nature: Code of the Treehopper

Hiding in plain sight and deceptively still, treehoppers have evolved an ingenious way to communicate—using a complex series of vibrations. Now, scientists are listening in and starting to crack the treehopper code. A...

Electromechanical instruments + rocks: Rock Band

Listen to The Beatles' Here Comes the Sun played with rocks that are being thrown, slapped, and vibrated by electromechanical instruments. This is Rock Band, a project created by Neil Mendoza as a part of Autodesk's a...

How a Bach Stradivarius trumpet is made

In this video series from musical instrument manufacturer Conn-Selmer, we see how a Bach Stradivarius trumpet is made. The mouthpiece above is shaped to the tune of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's Flight of the Bumblebee. T...

Seashell inspiration: Growing cement bricks with bacteria

Imagine an 8-year-old girl studying a seashell on the sand in Gulf Shores, Alabama in 1985. It's her first trip to the beach and it's a moment that will set the course of her career: “The 8-year-old version of mys...

Why does a frozen lake sound like a Star Wars blaster?

Ice can make all sorts of sounds: cracking, crackling, musical booooooms... and that pew! pew! Star Wars blaster sound. How? In this episode of NPR's Skunk Bear, we learn about acoustic dispersion and how the phenomen...

This invention helped me write again – Emma Lawton

Graphic Designer Emma Lawton would draw and write as a large part of her work and daily life, but after being diagnosed in 2012 with early-onset Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative brain disorder, using her hands...

The Waterphone

Invented by Richard Waters in the late 1960s, the waterphone is an unusual instrument that often contains a bit of water to help create its signature sound. Used in a variety of movies and albums, the instrument is of...

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