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The Kid Should See This

How to make a periscope

Periscopes can help you see around corners using two mirrors placed at 45-degree angles. Learn how to make your own with this DIY cardboard periscope video hosted by mechanical engineer Dr. Shini Somara. She talks with Dyson engineers about the ways we can see and use how light travels in straight lines.

how light travels in a periscope
laser reflecting across multiple mirrors
The video is one in a series of James Dyson Foundation engineering challenges to get students excited about science and engineering. Download this handy Challenge Cards pdf for the entire set of 44 classic STEM activities, or visit their site for more information.

what to use to build a cardboard periscope
Related reading: Reflection and Refraction.

Watch this next: LENSES, an prism-filled light and sound installation.

Then check out five unique at-home science experiments with Physics Girl, and more from Dr. Somara and Dyson:
• Balloon Car Race
• Cardboard Boats
Spaghetti bridges

Bonus: Building the Giant Magellan Telescope, the world’s largest telescope.

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