Tag: science

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ScienceTake: The secrets of a sidewinder snake on a sandy slope

If you've ever run up a sandy hill, you know it can be tough to get up it quickly -- each foot sinking and sliding as you climb upward. Sidewinder snakes, however, can slither up hills rather efficiently, even in comp...

To the Scientists of the Future: Materials science with EUPHRATES

Created by EUPHRATES and Masahiko Sato for Japan's National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), these three "To the Scientists of the Future" short films are a mesmerizing combination of materials research innovati...

Korea Aerospace Research Institute: Human-Powered Aircraft

How would you design a human-powered aircraft? Watch these teams compete to keep their pedal-powered vehicles aloft in an annual, crash-filled contest held at South Korea's Goheung Airlines Center. This 2013 video was...

It’s Okay to Be Smart: Why Do Clouds Stay Up?

Clouds are filled with so many water droplets that they're actually heavy... like 100 elephants heavy or a 747 airplane heavy! So why don't clouds fall out of the sky? It's Okay to Be Smart's Joe Hanson explains every...

Beautiful Chemical Reactions

Metal displacement, precipitation, crystallization, and more: This is Beautiful Chemistry, a 4K UltraHD short film project that aims to share how beautiful chemical reactions can be. From Tsinghua University Press and...

At-Bristol: How to make a hot air balloon

What is a hot air balloon made of and how are they made? Find out as At-Bristol Science Centre's Ross Exton visits Cameron Balloons, one of the world's oldest hot air balloon manufacturers, to learn more about the mat...

The Animal That Wouldn’t Die: The Hydra

Just a few millimeters long and full of embryonic cells, the hydra is a small and mysterious cnidarian polyp that seems to defy mortality. Skunk Bear's Adam Cole and Robert Krulwich team up to tell the amazing tale of...

Why do leaves change color?

The arrival of autumn is a great reason to talk about chemistry: When tree leaves change from green to reds, oranges, yellows, and browns, we're seeing the tree's green chlorophyll fade away, revealing hidden autumnal...

NOVA PBS: Immunity and Vaccines Explained

Why do we get shots when visiting the doctor? How do vaccines work with our immune systems to keep us from getting sick? From NOVA PBS: Immunity and Vaccines Explained. Our bodies are bombarded by bacteria and ...

AsapSCIENCE: Paper Towel vs Hand Dryers

Washing your hands properly with soap and water successfully rids your hands of nearly all traces of bacteria. After the soap and water, drying your hands with a hand dryer is most efficient. You can help prevent ...

First Evidence for Water Ice Clouds Found Outside Solar System

Take a (peacefully quiet) tour through and beyond our solar system to visit a neighboring brown dwarf -- a sort of failed star that's too large to be called a planet -- called W0855. A team of scientists, led by Carne...

Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

When a peacock spider dances, how do we know that it's a really, really good dancer? From their colorful, iridescent body displays, to their wide variety of dance moves, to the different rhythms that they "sing" while...

Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible

"Everything that you can actually see with your eye is just the smallest sliver of life on this Earth. Most of life is invisible..." And so begins the exquisite paper-puppetry of Seeing the Invisible, a video by F...

MIT’s electric cheetah-bot runs offleash

Quiet, efficient, and powerful: MIT's robotic cheetah has a "custom-designed, high-torque-density" electric motor, and can run and jump around without being tethered to an external power source. It's also looking ...

Two weeks under the sea at Aquarius Reef Base

Travel down to Aquarius Reef Base, the only underwater research lab on the sea floor, with Mission 31 aquanaut and scientist Liz Bentley Magee. In this NOVA PBS video, she explains what it's like to live in this incre...

A pendulum wave demonstration with bowling balls

Thanks to these 16 bowling balls hung from a 20 foot wooden frame in the mountains of North Carolina, we can see what a large-scale pendulum wave apparatus looks (and sounds) like. Filmed by Maria Ikenberry, she also ...

Power of Optics: A light-powered Rube Goldberg machine

In this commercial for au Hikari, one of Japan’s high-speed optical internet service providers, a Rube Goldberg machine is "powered" by a single beam of light that travels via mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflecti...

Laniakea: Our home supercluster

Our home planet, Earth, circles the sun. The sun, our star, is but one of billions of stars in the Milky Way, our home galaxy... and beyond that? Where on the map of the cosmos is the Milky Way? For the first time, we...

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