NASA

Showing 57 posts tagged NASA

Switch this video to HD full screen and marvel at the incredible detail in which we can now observe the sun, our closest star. This video is filled with year four highlights from the Solar Dynamics Laboratory (SDO), and it’s incredible.

Previously, the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and Jewel Box Sun: how SDO converts the wide range of invisible wavelengths into colorized images that our human eyes can see.

via Discover.

From NASA Goddard, Jewel Box Sun, a surprising video that illuminates how NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) converts a wide range of invisible wavelengths into colorized images that our human eyes can see. 

As the colors sweep around the sun in the movie, viewers should note how different the same area of the sun appears. This happens because each wavelength of light represents solar material at specific temperatures. Different wavelengths convey information about different components of the sun’s surface and atmosphere, so scientists use them to paint a full picture of our constantly changing and varying star. 

There are more Solar Dynamics Observatory videos in the archives.

via Metafilter.

On December 24, 1968, the Apollo 8 crew orbited the moon and discovered Earth. Astronauts James Lovell, command module pilot, William Anders, lunar module pilot, and Frank Borman, commander, were the first people to leave our planet to orbit another rocky body in space, and in this NASA video, we can travel with them to witness the moment they captured this iconic photo of home: Earthrise.

The 45th anniversary video uses data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft with audio recordings, data, and photographs from the orbiting lunar excursion module (LEM) to recreate this exhilarating and unanticipated moment of teamwork.

In the archives: more from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and oodles of amazing videos about Earth.

via sagan sense.

Need a battery-powered, modular, humanoid robot with strong legs and an amazing array of built-in cameras to help set up habitation on Mars for pioneering astronauts? NASA’s got you covered. Meet Valkyrie.

"The space agency’’’s new Valkyrie — a 6 foot 2 inch tall (1.9 meters) robot with a glowing NASA logo on its chest — bears an uncanny resemblance to Marvel’s superhero Iron Man, but this space age automaton was built for work, not comic book heroics. A team of engineers at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Tex., designed and built Valkyrie in just nine months, according to press reports."

NASA created Valkyrie for DARPA’s upcoming Robotics Challenge Trials on December 20-21, 2013, where it will be in competition with 17 teams from around the world including NASA JPL’s RoboSimian, Carnegie Mellon University-NREC’s CHIMP, and Japan’s SCHAFT.

There are always more robot videos in the archives.

via kqedscience.

How can we know the size, composition, and atmospheric makeup of distant exoplanets? NASA explains the details in this Alien Atmospheres video. 

By observing periodic variations in the parent star’s brightness and color, astronomers can indirectly determine an exoplanet’s distance from its star, its size, and its mass. But to truly understand an exoplanet astronomers must study its atmosphere, and they do so by splitting apart the parent star’s light during a planetary transit. 

Watch more astronomy videos, including Measuring the Universe and The Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

via Boing Boing.