space shuttle

Showing 8 posts tagged space shuttle

Recorded on a Kennedy Space Center tour before the launch of the last Space Shuttle mission (Atlantis), watch tour attendees pick up NASA’s 2,200 degree thermal tiles — specially designed, coated LI-900 ceramic tiles made out of 99.9% pure silica glass fibres and 94% by volume of air. (Thanks, @Bilsko.) From wikipedia

White tiles (known as LRSI) are used mainly on the upper surface and have higher thermal reflectivity. These are therefore pointed towards the sun in order to minimize solar gain.

Black tiles (known as HRSI) are optimized for maximum emissivity, which means they lose heat faster than white tiles. This property is required in order to maximise heat rejection during re-entry.

Read more about how the space shuttle thermal protection systems work and watch Dr. Ainissa Ramirez demonstrate and explain more about the 27,000 ceramic tiles on the bottom of the space shuttle:

More Material Marvels and more Space Shuttle videos in the archives. 

Mission 26 The Big Endeavour, a time lapse video of the Space Shuttle Endeavour's journey through the streets of Los Angeles, from LAX to its new home at the California Science Center. The video was created by Matthew Givot and his team of six time-lapse specialists.

The California Science Center created a map of the route that took four days and four nights to complete. Total distance: 11.72 miles.

via Vimeo.

Photographer Scott Andrews, his son New York Times photographer Philip Andrews, and Apple software engineer Stan Jirman animated photographs that they made during the space shuttle Atlantis last roll-out, (ie. the process of getting a shuttle ready for its last launch).

They’ve also done this before for Discovery’s next-to-last flight in 2010. You can read more about that video on AirSpaceMag.com.

via Vimeo.

A Blast From The Past: Shuttle Through The Decades

One year ago today at 11:29 a.m. EDT, Atlantis launched into orbit at 17,500 mph. A bittersweet launch, it was the very last NASA shuttle mission — though thankfully not the last of the excitement for space explorers. 

If you and your kids can handle some sensory overload, watch all 135 space shuttle launches at once. It gave us a chance to talk about the Challenger disaster and provided a new perspective on the 1981-2011 shuttle program.