Kenya

Showing 4 posts tagged Kenya

A few years ago, U.K. wildlife photographer William Burrard-Lucas started building a series of remote controlled DSLR camera vehicles as a DIY project. Named the BeetleCam, it’s now better protected, has space for a GoPro, and is a commercially available product.

Continuing to improve on his ideas and invent new ways to observe wildlife, Burrard-Lucas developed a gyro-stabilized BeetleBot and a BeetleCopter, which filmed the above scenes in the Serengeti, though they’re working on a quieter version. (A note for sensitive kiddos: half of a fresh kill shown at 2m14s.)

Below, a project update that shows all of his camtraptions.”

And look! Lion cubs stealing camerasHere’s one of the early teaser videos for an early version of the BeetleCam: 

In the archives: more Africa and so much nature.

via spectrum.ieee.org.

What Does the World Eat for Breakfast — in Egypt, Vietnam, Sweden, or where you live? While these showcased morning foods are only some of the possible breakfasts in each of these countries, this Buzzfeed video is a solid conversation starter for introducing the variety of traditional food preferences around the globe.

In the archives: more food.

The Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya is a small charity that works for the conservation of elephants and the highly endangered Black Rhino. The Trust specializes in taking care of the babies that are orphaned through poaching. 

This is the story of Kinango, one of their new baby elephants: 

At around 4pm on the 11th August a call was received about a tiny newborn elephant calf discovered by KWS personnel in the Kwale area outside of the Shimba Hills National Park. The elephant calf was stranded, hungry and visibly stressed when it was first found walking along the Kwale-Kinango road near the Mwadabawa junction, later seeking comfort under an abandoned truck which obviously felt like Mum.

Originally because he was so tiny it was thought he was new born and a plasma drip was administered to this vulnerable male calf in an attempt to ensure his immune system was boosted, but now that a few weeks on he has begun to teeth is would suggest that he was between 3 – 4 weeks on arrival. 

Despite being an incredibly vulnerable newborn calf, Kinango as he has since been named, has been taking his milk with enthusiasm from his keepers and is very much a treasured and precious part of the Nairobi Orphan’s group, pampered by all the older elephants.

We also loved the story of young Balguda, who arrived at the Trust’s Nairobi Nursury into what seemed like hugs and warm welcomes from other young elephants. 

via @jenbee.