Topic: fluids

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How to make a self-starting siphon

To move liquid from one container to another, you may need a siphon, a bent tube with one end that's lower than the first. Suction is one way to get the liquid moving through it, but if you don't have a pump and you d...

The Science of Hearing

The ability to recognize sounds and identify their location is possible thanks to the auditory system. That’s comprised of two main parts: the ear, and the brain. The ear’s task is to convert sound energy into neural ...

Which is stronger: Glue or tape?

The oldest glue in the world is over 8,000 years old and comes from a cave near the Dead Sea. Today, we have enough types of tape and glue to build and repair almost anything. But what gives glue and tape their sticki...

Liquid Sand Hot Tub: Making a giant fluidized bed of sand

When air is pumped through sand in just the right way, the sand begins to behave a lot like a fluid. As air escapes between the sand particles, items placed in the sand will begin to float. Others will sink. And when ...

Surface tension and The Cheerios Effect

Ever notice how cereal clumps up in your bowl, or how cereal sticks to the edges of the bowl? Bubbles in beverages do the same thing. You've probably seen this surface tension and buoyancy at work, but did you know th...

Demonstrations of the Coanda Effect

Fluids flowing near a surface tend to follow the shape of the surface. Using Schlieren optics, we can see this behavior. It is known as the Coanda Effect and its explanation depends on viscosity, the frictional forces...

How Far Do Sneezes and Vomit Travel? – Gross Science

Let's enter the world of sneeze experiments and vomiting machines with Anna Rothschild as she explains just how far the tiny liquid particles from sneezes and vomit can travel... and it's farther than you think. 'Vomi...

Chemical Bouillon, a series of visually abstract chemical reactions

Hydrocarbon vs Ink - Implosion, above, from the Chemical Bouillon video series, "an artistic project studying the graphic aspect of chemical reactions" created by Antoine Delach, Valere Amirault, and Teurk in Paris, F...

Ferrofluid + Glow Sticks – The Physics Girl

Ferromagnetic + fluid = ferrofluid, a liquid containing nanoscale particles of magnetite, hematite, or an iron compound. Invented by NASA's Steve Papell in 1963, ferrofluid forms undulating spikes and patterns as it r...

An octopus that makes quicksand for a quick escape

The southern sand octopus can make a quick escape by making its own quicksand. How? It shoots jets of water into the sand grains, separating them into an almost fluid state, and allowing the octopus to burrow. There u...

Ferrolic – A ferrofluid clock prototype by Zelf Koelman

Watch ferromagnetic fluid travel across a blank surface like living creatures: undulating forward, dancing rhythmically, blobbing together in organic shapes to digitally display the current time. Ferrolic, a ferroflui...

A solid, liquid, & gas at the same time – The Triple Point

How can a chemical be a solid, a liquid, and a gas at the same time? In the video above, a clear liquid called cyclohexane is experiencing the perfect pressure and temperature combination for its solid, liquid, and ga...

Odyssey: A universe of ink, oil, soap, and glitter in macro detail

Made with a mix of ink, oil, soap, and glitter, art director Ruslan Khasanov has filmed a sparkling experimental video that explores how the fluids interact with each other in macro detail. This is Odyssey. ...

“Analog experiments” that appear to defy gravity

If we could control gravity, or if we could defy it, this is what it might look like: pouring water upside down, balloons flying away sideways, and paint dripping in all directions! This is Gravity, a series of "analo...

Slime Cannon Attack – How Velvet Worm slime jets work

Giant velvet worms (Peripatus solorzanoi) are unusual creatures for many reasons -- including the fact that they are "not worms, not insects, millipedes, centipedes, or slugs" -- but their super-sliming glands, rapidl...

Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

This beautifully-made video about a beautifully-colored series of experiments from a Stanford research team showcases how a observing a few droplets of food coloring -- made of water and propylene glycol -- have led t...

What makes that fresh rain smell? MIT films rain drops to find out

Why do we smell that fresh earthy scent before and/or after it rains? With high-speed cameras, MIT researchers have filmed rain drops, and believe that the footage explains petrichor, the "pleasant smell that frequent...

The Sticky Feet of Ants & Cockroaches – Cambridge Ideas

Have you ever watched an ant walk up a wall? Have you seen one upside down on a ledge while carrying something? How do insect feet stick like that?! Get a very close look at the minuscule foot anatomy of ants and cock...

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